Joomla Templates and Joomla Extensions by JoomlaVision.Com

«РУССКАЯ ОПЕРА» «РУССКАЯ ОПЕРА»

rus-opera rus-opera

rus-opera rus-opera

rus-opera rus-opera

rus-opera rus-opera

rus-opera rus-opera

rus-opera rus-opera

rus-opera rus-opera

rus-opera rus-opera

rus-opera rus-opera

rus-opera rus-opera

About  theatre «RUSSKAYA OPERA»

After several years of fruitful cooperation of a group of young opera singers with St. Nicolas the Miracle-Worker Charitable Foundation, as well as after numerous concert tours throughout the country, it became clear that there was a huge demand for the classical opera art among the ordinary audience. Even 100 years ago it was humble folks, not kings and ministers, who sang arias from Verdi’s operas.

Thus, it was decided to establish a theater which could give the opportunity to learn more about the classical art not only to the residents of the cities where there are opera theaters, but also to those people who live in the regions where there are no opera theaters for objective reasons. The chiefs of the Foundation – the members of the Local Council of the Russian Orthodox Church Andrey Yuryevich Bykov and Mikhail Ivanovich Chepel – supported our idea, having considered it to be interesting and up-to-date, on condition that there should be high quality and selfless devotion to the work.

People’s Artist of the USSR, a State Award Laureate, a soloist of the Bolshoi Theater of Russia Alexander Filippovitch Vedernikov agreed to become the theater’s art director. Unfortunately, the modern European opera theatre tends to be the theatre for a select few, for the music ‘gourmets’. Of course, for true opera-lovers (who are really few and far between), knowing by heart the vast majority of the most popular operas, it might be interesting to watch “Boris Godunov” set in New York in the 1930s, or “Eugene Onegin” where Lensky is killed by a stray bullet during a drunken brawl. But what those who come to the theatre for the first time should do? Such people are always predominant. Fortunately, the tendency to change the authors’ ideas according to one’s own ambitions has not yet prevailed in Russia, unlike many Western countries, but is gaining momentum year by year. Our theatre has risen to the challenge of struggling against it by creating performances in a realistic and traditional manner so that the audience would be able to understand what is happening on the stage.

It is those particular goals that we pursued in our first performance, “The Marriage of Figaro” by Mozart, and the audience’s responses in various cities and towns throughout the country suggested that we achieved our aim. To disentangle the plot web of Beaumarchais’s play  and make it readily understandable to the audience, it had been decided that the performance should be given in Russian. The reason is that “The Marriage of Figaro” is a comedy with quite a complicated, even intricate plot, with a lot of dress-changing and funny situations which require the audience’s understanding and instant reaction.

The actors’ experience, talent and burning ambition to work under the supervision of the production director Mikhail Kislyarov, one of the most sought-after contemporary Russian directors, helped us overcome all the hurdles and present the brilliant musical comedy by Mozart and Beaumarchais.
The second premiere by our theatre was “The Fair at Sorochintsi” by Mussorgsky. In this  performance, back on stage came one of the greatest Russian bass singers Alexander Filippovich Vedernikov who, at his advanced age, had learnt the part of Solopiy Cherevik, previously unfamiliar to him. On 20 March 2009, within the framework of Mussorgsky First International Festival of Russian Opera held in Tver, there was given the pre-premiere performance, where Alexander Filippovich demonstrated his extremely high level as a singer and an actor. “The Fair at Sorochintsi” was worked on by the same team as in the case of “The Marriage of Figaro”. By means of this performance we have paid homage to our prominent compatriots Mussorgsky and Gogol whose 170th and 20th anniversaries, respectively, we celebrated in 2009.

In December 2009, “Russkaya Opera” gave another premiere – the charming fairytale opera “Hänsel and Gretel” written by the German composer Engelbert Humperdinck at the very end of the 19th century.

The composer was asked to compose this opera by his sister Adelheid Wette and it was meant to become his Christmas present for her children. A. Wette created the libretto out of the well-known fairy tale “The Gingerbread House”.





THE THEATRE
Share a link ОднаКнопка
Comment on a LiveJournal community rus_opera

Новости

Communication

Our theater community
on LiveJournal
(in Russian)

Share a link

ОднаКнопка

Мастер-класс

Предлагаем вашему вниманию видеомастер-класс по пению Александра Филиповича Ведерникова

  -  ,
We have online 38 guests